3 Reasons Palm Sunday is Powerful

Then the multitudes who went before and those who followed behind cried out, saying; Hosanna to the Son of David! Blessed is the name of the Lord! Hosanna in the Highest! Matt. 21:9

When we celebrate Palm Sunday, we are celebrating a monumental occasion. As we see Jesus ride into Jerusalem on a donkey and allow the people to praise Him as king, there are many things that stand out. Here are three of the most significant things we should keep in mind.

1. Jesus was orchestrating the event because his time had come

It is important to realize that the Triumphal Entry is the first time Jesus allowed the people to praise him as King. Every time before this he had forbidden them to do so because his time had not yet come, but it was now time. In allowing the people to praise him, he was bringing the wrath of both the Jewish and Roman leaders upon himself. He was not being pushed around by the principalities and powers; he was orchestrating them and setting things in motion for the passion week. He was coming to save us as prophecied by Zechariah.

Rejoice greatly, O daughter of Zion! Shout aloud, O daughter of Jerusalem! Behold, your king is coming to you; righteous and having salvation is he, humble and mounted on a donkey, on a colt, the foal of a donkey. – Zechariah 9:9

2. Jesus was being selected as the Passover lamb according to Old Testament law

Jesus said he came not to abolish the law but to fulfill it, and he does this in many ways. One fascinating detail he fulfilled has to do with Passover. Matthew Henry points out, “The Passover was on the fourteenth day of the month, and this [the triumphal entry] was the tenth.” The tenth day of the month was significant concerning Passover. We read this in Exodus 12:3,5-6

“Speak ye unto all the congregation of Israel, saying, In the tenth day of this month they shall take to them every man a lamb, according to the house of their fathers, a lamb for a house….Your lamb shall be without blemish, a male of the first year: ye shall take it out from the sheep, or from the goats: And ye shall keep it up until the fourteenth day of the same month: and the whole assembly of the congregation of Israel shall kill it in the evening.”

As Jesus was riding in and the people were crying “Hosanna in the highest,” unbeknownst to them they were selecting the paschal lamb for sacrifice; the one and only sacrifice that can take away sin and cause death to pass over us.

3. Jesus was marching to his death, and he knew it

Jesus was not merely riding into the city, but riding forward to his death. He knew by the end of the week he would be beaten, spit upon, and crucified, but the thought of this torturous death was not the most grueling image he would have foreseen. It would have been thoughts of that final moment when he was to take on the sins of us who call him Lord, and his Father, whom he had obeyed perfectly, would turn his face away from his Son and pour out his justice and wrath. In anguish, he knew, he would cry out “Father why have you forsaken me.”

On the way to the cross, the entry must have been bittersweet. As we consider this moment we know that nothing could have hindered him from reaching his goal. As he rode, his mind would have most likely been directed to those he came to save. Maybe he saw our faces, knowing that without his death, he would have to watch us die. For we were born sinners, hopeless, and condemned already. Maybe he looked at us as a man who would look into the eyes of his bride as disease steals her away. Whatever he was thinking, he was not going to let anything stand between him and those he came to save.

His desire to see his Father glorified and his love for us drove him forward, and when the time of the crucifixion came, he reached His destination. Upright, between two thieves, nailed to the cross, and having a spear thrust into His side, the cleansing blood and water flowed. His final cry was “It is finished.” The purchase had been made, and the powers of hell had been broken, because Sunday was right around the corner. In the words of Charles Spurgeon, “no sin of the believer can now be an arrow to mortally wound him.” All of us who have faith in Him and have been saved by His grace, have every reason to sing,

Hosanna to the Son of David!
Blessed Be the Name of the Lord!
Hosanna in the Highest!

D. Eaton

Was That Worship?

I had a co-worker once who loved just about everything Disney. He put a sticker on his car, and would proudly wear Disney hats and shirts. He was one of the managers at the store where I was working, and I remember one day when everything was going wrong he said to me “when this day is over I am going home, and I’m going to watch an old Disney movie.” When I pressed him a bit as to why he chose to watch an old Disney movie as opposed to anything else, he said, “Disney things just bring me back to when I was a kid.” Ultimately there was a sense of nostalgia from all the memories of growing up, and these things moved his affections in a way that made him feel a bit better after a hard day.

On another note, music has a way of doing the same type of things for us. I can remember in high school and college, and it even happens now occasionally, when I would be listening to secular radio and that new song that I had been waiting to hear would come on. Immediately, I would turn up the volume, and I would be energized by what I was hearing. I would sing along with all the passion I could muster; sometimes to questionable lyrics.

There is nothing wrong with a bit of nostalgia and being energized or moved by some piece of music, provided the context is not sinful, but when you put these things together with a Christian worship service, or program, we must be careful to discern our affections. I bring this up because sometimes we can be misled to think that we have had a time of worship, or that we have heard a great sermon, on the sole basis that our affections had been moved.

We must pay close attention to what is stirring our hearts to discern whether or not it is worship or even spiritual. When the worship leader plays the first chords of our favorite praise song, are we being energized much like the natural man who hears a secular song that causes him to turn up the radio, or are we truly worshipping? And when grandma’s favorite Hymn starts to play and causes us to experience a time of peace and contentment while thinking back to when she used to sing it to us as a child, do we sometimes confuse that with worship?

Now I am not saying we should only sing dull songs or songs that don’t remind us of anything, or that it is impossible to be truly worshipping during these times. In fact, I think it can be good at times to remember our family worship from when we were growing up, and I also believe it is good that we still have people today writing new psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs for us to sing today that gets us excited. What I want to stress is that simply because we have these moments, does not mean we are worshipping or that we have been moved in adoration of God. Charles Spurgeon once said that if he wanted to, he could move congregations to tears by telling them sad stories of mothers with sick children or energize them by telling them stories of men and women who accomplished great things. He then went on to say, it would be a waste of time unless they were moved to cry over their sin and take joy in Christ and the cross. In other words, were their hearts and attention drawn to God.

Even the natural man’s affections can be moved in powerful ways, but those affections will never be worship unless we are moved by the truth of scripture as the Holy Spirit points us to Christ and what He has done for us. Whether we attend a modern or traditional worship service is not the biggest issue, but we must be sure to seek out worship and preaching that convicts us of sin, and shows us the remedy in Christ, which is the foundation of all true worship.

-D. Eaton-

Pilgrim’s Progress Discussion Questions by Chapter

Recently I taught a class through Pilgrim’s Progress. Below are the discussion questions for each chapter. An introductory lecture along with audio for the discussion time for each chapter can be found here.

Chapter 1 

1. What is the book Christian has in his hand?

2. What is the burden that Christian is carrying, and have you ever felt this burden?  If so, what did it feel like?

3. Christian reads the book and prays but still has the burden on his back.  How is this possible?

4. Pliable has no burden on his back yet still follows Christian.  Why would someone do this, and have you ever ran across people like this?  What kind of “churches” appeals to people like this?

5. What do you think the “Slough of Despond” represents?

6. Where, and to whom, does Mr. Worldly Wiseman direct Christian, and what false view of salvation does this represent?

7. Read Heb. 10:38 – How does this verse fit with Christian trying to remove his burden with morality and the law.

8. Do you ever find yourself trying to find relief for the conviction of sin by attempting to be moral rather than laying it all on Christ?  What do you do in those times?

9. Worldly Wiseman is a false teacher, and Evangelist gives Christian three reasons to abhor him. What are they, and do they still apply to false teachers today?

10. When Christian is grieved by his sin of listening to Worldly Wiseman, Evangelist tells him is sin is very great.  How is this different than what you may hear in many churches today?

Chapter 2

christian-at-the-narrow-gate1.  Christian runs to the wicket gate and knocks more than once or twice, what do the running and the knocking teach us?

2. Goodwill pulls Christian through the gate. Why does he do this, and what do these dangers represent?

3.  Christian goes through the wicket gate and enters the narrow path. Some people view this as the moment of his salvation, but he still has his burden on his back (which he will lose later).  What do you think about this?

4.  Who do you think the interpreter represents?

5.  How does Christian explain to Goodwill that he and Pliable are alike?  What does this teach us about Christian’s attitude?

6.  Who or what do you think the man in the picture, who is authorized as Christian’s guide, represent(s)?

7.  How is the heart of man like the dusty room, and what happens when the room is attempted to be cleaned with the broom of the law?  What does this teach us about the law?

8.  What do Passion and Patience represent in the Christian life, and what do we learn from them?  Can you think of any Bible passages that relate to this?

9.  What happens to the fire burning near the wall, and what do we learn from it?  Can you think of any Bible passages that relate to this?

10.  The picture of the man in the iron cage is one of the most shocking scenes in Pilgrims Progress. What was your reaction when you read it and what do you think it means?

Chapter 3

Image1.  How does Christian lose his burden, and what does this represent?  Have you heard of any testimonies that would illustrate this scene?

2.  Last chapter we discussed whether entering the wicket gate in chapter 2 was his conversion.  What do you think now that you have read of his burden being removed?

3.  Three beings come to Christian, what do they represent and what do they do for him?  Where do we see these things in Scripture?

4.  How do Formalist and Hypocrisy get on the road of salvation?  What lesson do they teach us? How do they defend their not entering at the wicket gate?

5.  When Christian was climbing Hill Difficulty, he finds a place set by the Lord for refreshing weary travelers. What does this represent, and what does it mean that he fell asleep there?

6.  What does it mean that Christian loses his scroll, and what does it teach us that it took a while before he realized it was gone?

7.  What is the role of the chained lions, and what do their chains teach us?

8.  What does Christian say his name was before it was Christian?

9.  What is Christian’s reason for wanting to go to Mount Zion?  How do these thoughts align with your reason for desiring heaven?

10.  What does Christian say is his wife’s reason for not following Christian?  Do you ever see the same tendency in your own life?

Chapter 4

Image1.  Christian has no armor to cover his back when he meets Apollyon, what does this teach us?

2.  Who does Apollyon represent?  What descriptions to do see in the book that leads you to that conclusion?

3.  Apollyon says, that “many of the Lord’s servants have come to an ill end.” To what is he referring, and how does Christian respond?

4.  How does Christian respond when Apollyon accuses him of many sins?

5.  Christian loses his sword while battling Apollyon. What does this look like in the Christian life?

6.  Christian receives leaves from the tree of life to heal his wounds, what picture is Bunyan painting here?  How do the bread and wine fit?

7.  Why do you think the way to the celestial city goes through the Valley of the Shadow of Death?

8.  Bunyan refers to the quag that King David fell into, to what do you think he is referring?

9.  The valley is so dark that “when [Christian] would lift his foot to go forward he knew not where, nor upon what he should set it next.” What Scripture does this bring to mind?

10.  Bunyan describes the giants Pope and Pagan as no longer a real threat, what do you think he is alluding to, and do you think he is correct?

Chapter 5

Image1.  Why does Faithful say Pliable is now seven times worse than before?  To what passage of Scripture does this allude?

2.  Who is Adam the First, and what are the names of his children?  What doctrine is Bunyan talking about here?

3.  Why do you think Bunyan portrays Moses as beating faithful, and what saved faithful from death?

4.  What friends are dishonored by going through the Valley of Humiliation? What was Faithful’s response?

5.  What were some of Shame’s arguments against faithful, and where do you hear these today?

6.  What does it mean that Talkative was more comely [attractive] at a distance than up close?

7.  Talkative says many true things, what then is the problem with him?  Do you ever have to guard your own heart against being like that?

8.  What are some of the ways Faithful says the work of grace is discovered in the life of a person?

9.  When Talkative is exposed as a hypocrite, what is his response to Faithful, and do you ever see this type of response happen to Christians today?

10.  Christian commends Faithful for talking so plainly with Talkative and laments that it rarely happens.  Do you think this is still true and why?

Chapter 6

20140221-101815.jpg1. Evangelist tells Christian and Faithful, “You are not yet out of the gun-shot of the devil; you have not yet resisted to bloodshed,” What does this mean? Read Hebrews 12:4 as you consider this.

2. What are some of the other things Evangelist tells them?

3. As you read of Vanity Fair, what aspects of today’s world come to mind? Has any of these aspects made it into the church?

4. Why were the people of Vanity Fair stirred up when Christian and Faithful arrived? What do these things look like in the Christian life?

5. What does it mean that Christian and Faithful said, “they would buy the truth?”

6. What were Christian and Faithful charged with by Lord Hate-good?

7. Which three people came forward to testify against Christian and Faithful?

8. Pickthank said Faithful railed against several men, what were their names?

9. What was Faithful’s response to the charges of the three men?

10. Knowing that John Bunyan was in jail for the faith when he wrote this, as you read the names of the jury that convicted Faithful, do you think this was an expression of how he saw the men who convicted him?

11. How is Faithful the most blessed one in this situation, even more than Christian?

Chapter 7

20140228-071053.jpg1.  Who are some of the citizens of the town of Fair-Speech, and against what is Bunyan trying to warn us?

2.  What does it mean when Christian says “you must also own religion in his rags, as well as in his silver slippers; and stand by him, too, when bound in irons, as well as when he walk in the streets with applause?”

3.  What scripture did Mr. Hold-the-World twist to defend his right to cling to the things of this world?

4.  How does Mr. Money-love defend using religion to get rich?  What is wrong with his arguments?

5.  Demas, who calls the people to the silver mine, is also a biblical character.  What is his story in Scripture (See Philemon 1:23-24, and 2 Timothy 4:10?)

6.  What is the River of the Water of Life where Christian and Hopeful walked?  Where do we see it in Scripture?

7.  Bunyan says the pilgrims had to go with Giant Despair because he was stronger than they. What does this teach us?

8.  Why was Christian in double sorrow in the dungeon?

9.  What were some of Hopeful’s arguments to Christian as to why they should not end their own lives?

10.  What does the key represent that unlocked the door to Doubting Castle, and what does it look like in the Christian life?

Chapter 8

Image1.  What were some of the sights the shepherds showed the pilgrims in the Delectable Mountains?

2.  Why does Ignorance think he will be accepted at the gate of the celestial city?

3. What is the story of Little-faith, and what do we learn from it?

4.  Bunyan describes Faint-heart, Mis-trust, and Guilt as powerful. Who were some of the Biblical examples that Bunyan gives who where injured by them?

5.  What warning does Christian gives us about desiring to meet our enemies, and what two things must we do if we do meet them?

6.  Why did Christian and Hopeful not recognize Flatterer, and what does this teach us?

7.  What were some of Atheist’s arguments to Christian and Hopeful?

8.  The Enchanted Ground had air that makes pilgrims drowsy, what situations in life have this effect on us?

9.  How do the pilgrims keep from falling asleep?  What does this look like in the Christian life?

10.  What aspects of Hopeful’s conversion do you find interesting and encouraging?

Chapter 9

 

Image
Ignorance
1.  Where did Ignorance ground his hope when asked whether he was right with God or not?  What are some examples where we hear similar things today?

 

2. What does Christian say to set Ignorance right about whether his thoughts are correct or not?

3.  What is Ignorance’s understanding of justification?  Where might we hear a view like this preached?

4.  What are Christian’s four responses to Ignorance’s false view of justification?

5.  What problem does Ignorance have with Christian’s response?

6.  What is Christian’s response to Ignorance’s objection to justification?

7.  How does Christian say that correct fear can be detected over a wrong fear?

8.  How do some people try to stifle the conviction of sin?

9.  What reasons does Hopeful give for Temporary’s backsliding?

10.  What does Christian say are the ways people like Temporary backslide?

Chapter 10

image1. Why do you think the grapes of the vineyard caused Christian and Hopeful to talk in their sleep? What is Bunyan trying to tell us?

2. Why do you think that Bunyan decided to use a river to represent death? What Scriptures come to mind?

3. The golden beings tell them that the river is “deeper or shallower as you believe in the King of the place.” What does this mean in the Christian life?

4. What do you think it means that Christian “in great measure lost his senses” as he crossed the river?

5. Why were Christian and Hopeful able to climb the hill to the Celestial City so easily?

6. Christian asks what they would do in the holy place, what were some of the things he was told by the ministering spirits?

7. What did you find interesting or encouraging about the reception the pilgrims received and the description of the Celestial City?

8. What was the name of the ferryman the helped Ignorance cross the river so easily?

9. Now that we have finished Christian’s story, what were some of the aspects of the book that had the biggest impact upon you?

D. Eaton

Answering Jewish Arguments Against Jesus

I recently had the privilege of being a guest on the Apologetics.com radio show which airs Saturday mornings on KKLA 99.5 FM in Los Angeles.  The discussion was lead by Christopher Neiswonger on how to answer Jewish arguments against Jesus.

The MP3 can be found at the link below, or it can be downloaded here. It can also be found in the Apologetics.com podcast.

Answering Jewish Arguments Against Jesus

D. Eaton

Why God’s Promise to Provide Does Not Always Give Us Peace

All throughout scripture, we are promised that God will meet our needs. Jesus said, “Look at the birds of the air: they neither sow nor reap nor gather into barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not of more value than they?And which of you by being anxious can add a single hour to his span of life?” (Matt. 6:26-27).

Like God feeding the Israelites with manna in the wilderness, God still provides for us today. He gives us what we need when we need it. Why then does this not always give us peace? Why, when the troubles come, do we still fret?

Edward T Welch sums it up best when he says, “Beneath our questions about God’s generosity and his care for our needs is something darker, what we really care about is our wants.?” God promises to take care of our needs, not our wants, and this is what often drives our anxieties. Much of the fight of faith must be fought on this front.

Welch goes on to say that “our version of the kingdom looks peculiarly like suburbia.” We have painted our own worldly pictures of what it means to be taken care of by God. Then, like Abraham having a child with Hagar, we try to force the promises to happen in our own way. Doing this only compounds our anxieties, because, not only are we worried about our wants, but we are now living as if God’s promise to provide depends on us. This type of anxiety is often seen in many of the prosperity churches.

God will give us what we need when we need it, but that does not mean you will never get sick, lose a job, a child, or even die yourself. What it means is that he will give us what we need to face these times should they come, and only when they come. Just like the Israelites never had tomorrow’s manna today, we may not have what we need to face these future difficult times now. In fact, we may not even be able to imagine how we could handle it, but we will, if the time comes. The Lord never fails.

We all have desires that war against our soul, and these are often the cause of our greatest anxieties. We need to align our wants with his word and our desires with his decrees. If we think that a trouble-free life now is what it is all about, our gospel and our God are too small. As Welch says, “Life in the kingdom is not easy, at least not when we want to share the throne.”

D. Eaton

The quotes by Edward Welch come from the book, Running Scared: Fear, Worry, and the God of Rest.

Every Fear Must Bow

You, O Lord, are my refuge and strength. No matter what fears assail me, they cannot stand before you. Whether my anxieties are based on reality or the result of my doubting heart, you are the calmer of my soul. There is no darkness your light cannot penetrate.

You are my peace. Every fear finds its defeat in you because none of them can overshadow your glory. There is no anxiety which can maintain its strength in the presence of your might. There is no cunning that can stand in the light of your wisdom and knowledge.

One day your Majesty will be acknowledged by all. Not only will every knee bow and every tongue confess that you are Lord, but, for all who come to you in faith, every sickness must heal, every broken heart must mend, every need must be met, and every loneliness must find its true companion. All of this is possible because no stain of sin can resist the cleansing power of your cross.

Nothing can touch you, O Lord, and my life is hidden in you. You are my helper, the upholder of my life. I give you thanks and praise in the midst of a dark and troubled land. May my worship be like a lighthouse calling to ships on a dangerous sea to find their rest in your harbor.

Calm my soul, O Lord. Let me look in triumph upon every fear. Let your peace, which passes understanding, rule in my heart. Hide me in the shadow of your wing. My soul clings to you, and your right hand upholds me.

O my Strength, I will watch for you, for you, O God, are my fortress. Psalm 59:9

D. Eaton (with help from the Psalms)

Pursued By God: A Surprising Turn of Events

I could feel the tension. I knew he had drawn his bow, and it was aimed right at me. I was the target. Even the slightest tinge of my guilty conscience made the creaks and groans of the bow string howl in my ears as it strained for release. I looked for places to hide, but wherever I went, he was there. I first tried to find refuge in morality. I thought, if I could be upright from here on out, then that should atone for my sin. There were two problems with this. First, I was unable to live a righteous life. What I had imagined was the standard, fell far short of what was required, and I wasn’t even able to live up to my own demands. This continued failure only multiplied my guilt. Second, I realized, even if I could live a perfect life from this point on, it would never be able to wash away my past sins.

I had no idea what to do, so I tried to ride out the storm thinking that time could heal all wounds. The problem is, no amount of time can atone for ungodliness. Being further away from my guilt did nothing to cleanse me of my transgressions.  There is no statute of limitations on sin, and his justice required the arrows be launched, so the wrath of God hung over me like a dark cloud.

Then I reread the passage, “If a man does not repent, God will whet his sword; he has bent and readied his bow;” (Psalm 7:12). All of sudden, the very passage that caused my heart to fear, illuminated my soul with hope. “If a man does not repent.” There was a way out. In my blindness, I had never noticed it before. God’s word was telling me that if a man turns to him, his bow would be at rest. In a flash of light, the Holy Spirit, who had awakened my soul to its peril, illuminated the truth of the Gospel I had heard over the years but never before understood. 

People had told me that the Lord Jesus had gone to the cross as an innocent man to bear the sins of those who would put their faith in Him. I knew he had willingly gone to his death on the cross, but it wasn’t until now that I realized, that the cup that he dreaded to drink was the wrath of this Father. Isaiah 53:10 resounded in my soul, “Yet it was the will of the LORD to crush him; he has put him to grief; when his soul makes an offering for guilt.” The wrath that I deserved had been pour out upon Jesus. I knew this because my heart was now alive with faith. His Spirit had given me new life.

It all made sense. The picture was clear. The arrows that had been trained upon me, the Father took, aimed them at His Son and let them fly. The bow of God’s wrath is now resting quietly, and there are no remaining arrows to be pointed my direction. He had forgiven my sins. It was his mercy that had been pursuing me all along. Instead of running from him, all I needed to do was turn around and run to him, because the minute I did, I saw him running to embrace me like the father of the prodigal son.

D. Eaton

It Could All Fall Apart, and That’s Ok

There is something about me that always wants to be in control. If I am sick, I want to outlearn the disease and overcome it. If relationships start to fail, I want to be able to charm them back to life. We all want to be in control. I think this is why there are so many diets promising snake oil results: don’t eat gluten, eat kale, only eat raw foods. I don’t say this as a judgment on eating right; it is a wise thing to do, but how much of it stems from the desire to be in charge. If there is something I can do, then it is something I can control. I am the master of my destiny. This desire to be in control has even found its way into Christian circles. “If you can muster enough faith, it will all go right. Positive thoughts create positive results.” The problem is, it is not true. We could do all of this, and it could still fall apart. We are not in control.

The storm around me reminds me of this. I realize, with every peal of thunder, that I am not the center of the universe. Regarding orchestrating the master plan for creation, I am no more special than the other 7 billion people on the planet. We all tend to live as if we are, but it is a delusion. You and I both could come into contact with something in this fallen world that could end our lives within a month, and there could be nothing we could do about it.

Once we are gone, our co-workers would remember us and then replace us. Sure, they may even put up a picture for a few years to commemorate our contribution, but they would be able to continue without us. Our demise would most likely hit our family the hardest, but our children would move on with their lives just like we would want them to. Even the one we love, if the Lord wills, would find someone else to love and with whom to share the rest of their life.

I don’t like to think about these things, but it is good. It reminds me that the world is not yet the way it should be, so I should not put my trust and hope in it. There is something eternal that deserves my devotion and attention. Something else should be my source of hope.

Though the storm swells around me, I have found salvation in the cleft of the rock: Christ Jesus. All the sins that caused me to be fearful of God have been forgiven. The great and righteous judge of the universe has reconciled me to Himself through the cross. Yes, I, a sinner, am a friend of God. In fact, He calls me His child.

One of the problems is that we often interpret being a child of God to mean, that we are now co-sovereigns with Him, but that is not the case. When the omnipotent God makes us His child, He does not stop being God. He does not hand us the reigns of the universe. Instead, He continues right on with His plan, and we should be glad.

What tends to bother us, is that He still keeps much of his plan hidden. The hidden things belong to the Lord (Deuteronomy 29:29). His judgments and ways are past finding out, and none of us have been his counselor (Romans 11:34). He has not told us everything He is doing. He is operating in a fallen world in many ways that are unseen and unknown to us, but He has given us some revelation. One of the things revealed is that he will return and set all things right. We sometimes complain that He has not done it yet, but it is His patience that makes him tarry. If it were not for His patience, none of us would be saved. The day He returns in glory will be a day of great trembling and delight for His child, but it will be a day of terror for those who do not know Him. Though we should desire His return, it is not something we should rush.

Our salvation involves so much more than what we have already experienced. Though we have nothing without it, salvation is more than justification. Redemption is much more than what happen to us as individuals. Though we are to strive to give people a glimpse of glory in this life, it is only a dim reflection. We cannot place all our hope in what we are experiencing now. He has given the Holy Spirit, and we know this is a guarantee of what is to come, but what we are experiencing now, is not the consummation of our salvation.

Everything could fall apart. The darkest things imaginable could happen, except one: that He would fail to complete our salvation. We will see Jesus face to face in all of His glory. One day all believers will inhabit a place without sickness, without tears, and without death. A place where it can no longer come undone, but this is not it.

If we think that everything must fall into place now for our salvation to be real and our faith to be true, we have a short-sighted view of both salvation and faith, and our God is too small. True faith will trust God even if He does not do what we want Him to do right now. What He is doing is bigger and better than what we could ever imagine, even if we don’t fully understand it. One day the hidden things will be revealed, and we will stand in awestruck wonder at the wisdom of His plan. No matter how dark and painful it gets, the believer wins in the end, because we will stand in the presence of Jesus. It could all fall apart, and that’s ok.

For the mountains may depart and the hills be removed, but my steadfast love shall not depart from you, and my covenant of peace shall not be removed,” says the LORD, who has compassion on you. – Isaiah 54:10

D. Eaton

Understanding Justification: The Necessity of Double Imputation

The Illustration

Double Imputation

His mom had laid out the situation. The room was to be clean by 4:00 p.m. If he completed the job on time, his mom would buy him movie tickets so he could go out with his friends. If he did not finish on time, he would be grounded for a week. At 4:00 p.m. he had not even started to clean the room, and he was grounded. What was astonishing was what he did when he finished serving his time. He walked up to his mother and said, “my punishment has been paid, now give me my movie tickets.” The request was absurd. Even though the penalty had been paid, he never fulfilled what was required to receive the reward.

The Explanation

We have all come into this world under certain requirements. We are called to live a righteous life. If we accomplish it, there is blessing, and if not, there is cursing. The problem is that Adam was unsuccessful, along with everyone who came after him. You and I have failed to inherit eternal life and have merited nothing but wrath. We have all sinned and fallen short of the glory of God.

No one had been successful until Jesus took on flesh and walked among us. He came, lived a perfect life and fulfilled the law. Then he went and died for our sins. He took our sins upon himself on the cross, becoming a curse for us. He bore the wrath that we deserved, but bearing our sins is not all he did. If it were, we would be like the young man asking for the reward after our punishment had been paid but having no claim to it. This shortcoming is why it is so important to understand that our justification involves two imputations: for those who have faith, our sins are imputed to Christ, and his righteousness is imputed to us.

Righteousness is more than guiltlessness. As our representative, Jesus not only bore our punishment and forgives us of our sins, but he also earned the reward by fulfilling what needed to be done. His righteousness is counted as ours. Because of this, we are not simply sinners who can no longer be punished. Instead, we are counted as those who had fulfilled the law, and we become co-heirs with Christ. Even now there is an inheritance being kept for us: one that can never perish, spoil, or fade.

When we stand before the Lord one day, we will have no merit of our own. We will stand and say, “it is because of what the Lord Jesus did in my place that I am declared righteous.” It is true that we will grow in righteousness as believers here and now, but the righteousness we attain in this life will never be the basis upon which we have a right standing before the Lord. Like Abraham, it is through faith that we are declared righteous, and it will always be Christ’s righteousness.

For as by the one man’s disobedience the many were made sinners, so by the one man’s obedience the many will be made righteous.-Romans 5:19

D. Eaton

How Chaos Points Us To Christ

It wasn’t until my world started spinning out of control that my true constant became crystal clear.  I had spent most of my life, including much of my life as a believer, aiming at moving targets. “Happiness is found in this direction” it would say, and then I would get there, and it would redirect, “no, over here, fulfillment is attained by chasing this,” and then as I got close, it would lead me on in another direction.

It is who we are by nature. Our souls seek their fulfilment in the things on the earth, and these chains are not easily broken. We lean on money, health, power, sexuality, and intelligence, for in them we think we will find our security. Regarding this, one of the greatest blessings the Lord gives His child is to show them just how empty those things truly are.  He allows our world to start to shake, and our imaginary supports crumble. What He is doing is revealing to us the miseries that are tied to these things if we trust in them.

It is easy to talk of this theoretically, but when it happens, our hearts will break. Remember we naturally love the things of this world, and sometimes the pain can be a deep as losing a loved one. A surgeon who finds his identity in his career gets Parkinson’s and everything he is invested in begins to fail. A business woman lauded by her colleagues for her sharp mind begins to struggle with her memory. A parent who finds their meaning in their children finds them rebelling and estranged. None of these things can happen without severe heartache.

As believers, when our world starts spinning out of control, we should ask, how is the Lord using this to show me the emptiness of the things I am trusting in and pointing me to my actual home?

It is at that moment that our eyes start looking for the one thing that is unchanging. The one thing in which, though the mountains be shaken and the hills be removed, we can rest our confidence. At that moment, Christ Jesus, who is the same yesterday, today, and forever begins to be seen in His glorious splendor, as the instability of the things of the world are exposed. The fascinating thing is the Lord, at that moment, is using the things that held us captive, to set us free. The spinning of our world is the very thing that reveals our true north.

It is good for me that I was afflicted, that I might learn your statutes. – Psalm 119:71

D. Eaton